Category Archives: Resin Art

This is a series that I’ve been working on for a while. I buy deep antique frames and fill them with layers of clear resign and images that I have meticulously cut out with a scalpel. I can achieve the illusion of remarkable depth, sort of like the forced perspective of baroque stage sets. I think of these as shadow boxes with views of weird, slightly ominous dreams.

Resurrection

Resurrection refers to the miracle of the cycle of life, death and rebirth. The egg symbolizes the immortal soul and the gold of the egg represents eternity and perfection. Ironically the folktale of the “goose and the golden egg” is … Continue reading

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Sophocles

Sophocles, one of the great playwright/tragedians of ancient Greece, wrote over 123 plays. Only seven have survived. Those plays include Oedipus Rex and Antigone. Nothing is more theatrical in our world than a red curtain that I layered into this … Continue reading

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Torrent

A deep resin piece where I float a gilded skull and a silver cube. Bubbles and turbulence( both real and crystal) form as the cube is plunged into the “water”.  The  cube is the earth element, and is symbolic of … Continue reading

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Cavern

Perhaps this reliquary series can be linked to “cabinets or curiosities” or the studiolos of the renaissance where unusual and exotic things could be examined in privacy.

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Reflection

I’m currently working on some deep boxes that allow me to use real objects in the compositions. Inside the box I use mirrors and resin to suspend the objects in interesting ways.

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Oberon

One of my baroque stage, deeply layered resin pieces. Oberon was the king of the fairies in Midsummer Nights Dream by Shakespeare.  Flowers with magical properties were used by Oberon.

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Versailles Enfilade

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